Written by 8:56 pm Wealth Building Views: [tptn_views]

LA home where Marilyn Monroe died saved from demolition — for now

The California home where Marilyn Monroe died in 1962 has been saved from demolition — for now.

After a unanimous city council vote, the sprawling Spanish colonial in Brentwood — whose owner, Glory of the Snow Trust, requested to have it torn down — was temporarily spared, in keeping with the Los Angeles Times.

“Immediately my team and I sprung into motion. … But unfortunately, the Department of Building and Safety issued a demolition permit before my team and I could fully intervene and get this issue resolved,” Councilmember Traci Park said at a press conference Friday.

Park donned red lipstick and styled her short blond hair to resemble the “Some Like It Hot” star — who was found dead in bed on the age of 36 — as she announced she would introduce a motion for 12305 Fifth Helena Drive to be considered a historic cultural monument.

“I’m here with you today because the custodian of the district which is home to Marilyn Monroe’s beloved final residence. I’m also here today as a defender of our city’s wealthy history and heritage,” the lawmaker said.


marilyn monroe house
Monroe bought the two,900-square-foot home for $75,000.
Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The property was the only one Monroe ever owned.
The property was the just one Monroe ever owned.
Getty Images

The city’s Office of Historic Resources will research, assess, and analyze the situation before the Historic Cultural Commission will make a advice to town council, the Times reported, adding that the method have to be accomplished inside 75 days.

The not-so-humble 1929-built 2,900-square-foot abode, which the blonde bombshell purchased within the early Nineteen Sixties after her third marriage to playwright Arthur Miller ended — then cost $75,000.

Its former owner, Glory of the Snow LLC, bought it for $7.25 million in 2017. In July, the LLC sold the property to Glory of the Snow Trust for $8.35 million.

During the general public portion of the meeting, some residents criticized the time spent debating the fate of Monroe’s former home while Los Angeles’ homeless crisis worsens.

Others, nonetheless, praised the initiative, saying it paid homage to town’s history.

“Preserving our history is a dignity that we as Angelenos have,” said Stacey Segarra-Bohlinger, a Sherman Oaks neighborhood council representative. “It is our duty and our honor to preserve and protect historical monuments. Developers are destroying our city for private gain. It is a disgrace and shouldn’t be allowed.”

The city council also voted unanimously to maneuver forward with its plans to deem it a historic cultural monument.


marilyn monroe
The starlet died in 1962 on the age of 36.
Michael Ochs Archives

Councilmember Park said that “each detail of the home, from its wooden beam ceilings to the tiles, were handpicked by Monroe and served as a touching reminder of her final days."
Councilmember Park said that “each detail of the house, from its picket beam ceilings to the tiles, were handpicked by Monroe and served as a touching reminder of her final days.”
AFP via Getty Images

The property was the just one Monroe ever owned, and Park said that “many, many tons of of individuals from everywhere in the world” contacted her office to specific their concern over its potential demise.

“For people everywhere in the world, Marilyn Monroe was greater than only a movie icon,” she said. “Her story from her difficult childhood growing up in orphanages and foster homes to becoming a worldwide sensation is a shining example of what it means to beat adversity.”

Park explained that “each detail of the house, from its picket beam ceilings to the tiles, “were handpicked by Monroe and served as a touching reminder of her final days.”

[mailpoet_form id="1"]
Close